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Webster Post
  • Poll results: New Yorkers say technology has made life better

  • According to a new Siena College Poll, 72 percent of those surveyed say they've benefited from new technologies, with only 12 percent who think they've made life worse. In New York, 92 percent say they have access to and use a cell phone, and 86 percent say the same about a computer. Over 90 percent agree that technology, like the Internet, has changed our lives by making more information available.

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  • The majority of New Yorkers say that technology has made life better, though they admit that devices like cell phones and laptops have also prompted anxiety.
    According to a new Siena College Poll, 72 percent of those surveyed think these devices have benefited them, with only 12 percent who think they've made life worse. In New York, 92 percent say they have access to and use a cell phone, and 86 percent say the same about a computer. Over 90 percent agree that technology, like the Internet, has changed our lives by making more information available.
    But the poll also highlighted some issues with the new technology. Nearly two-thirds of New Yorkers said the new devices cause them increased stress. And 79 percent say children use computers, cell phones and video games too much. Other concerns included drivers talking on cell phones, texting while driving, Internet bullying, sexting, Internet pornography and the use of the Internet for criminal ends.
    “Cell phones, smartphones, computers and the Internet have become part of everyday life for most New Yorkers. A majority have a cell phone, a computer and an MP3 player. Over half have flat screen TV’s and a GPS system. But feelings are mixed. Despite most concluding that all the new technologies have improved our quality of life, nine out of ten say we now spend too much time with machines and buttons rather than with people or nature,” according to Don Levy, director of the Siena Research Institute.
    “Seventy percent of those with cell phones use it every day and nearly half of users have a smartphone. Of those, forty-two percent admit that when they don’t have their smartphone with them they feel anxious, isolated and out of touch,” notes Levy.
    Personal computer use is greatest among young people (94 percent) and those with incomes above $100K (99 percent) but it remains high among those with incomes below $50K (73 percent), less than a college degree (79 percent) and those over 65 years of age (66 percent). Nearly half of state residents (46 percent) use a computer many times each and every day and 58 percent use it both at work and for personal reasons. Ninety percent email friends and colleagues, 88 percent use their computer to research topics of interest and 80 percent for travel directions.
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