A local political scientist thinks it is very unlikely that the Electoral College will be able to change the outcome of this year's presidential election when they officially cast their ballots on Monday. Dr. Timothy Kneeland, a political science professor at Nazareth College, says that Monday's vote is more of a formality than anything else.

A local political scientist thinks it is very unlikely that the Electoral College will be able to change the outcome of this year's presidential election when they officially cast their ballots on Monday.

Dr. Timothy Kneeland, a political science professor at Nazareth College, says that Monday's vote is more of a formality than anything else. The electoral college has 538 members, all chosen by their state's political parties. Kneeland says history shows that most will vote for whoever won the election in their state.

News10NBC: "So it's nearly impossible this will change the outcome?"

Kneeland: "It's very unlikely that you could get 37 people to conspire to change the election outcome."

That's the number of electors who essentially would have to buck their party. Kneeland says history shows some electors have changed their vote to go against the winner -- but it's never actually changed the outcome of an election. If an elector does that, they could be penalized and have to pay a fine.

But since Donald Trump did not win the popular vote- Hillary Clinton won by over two million votes- experts say a movement is underway to get rid of the Electoral College.

Kneeland suggested one alternative:

"Maybe they could put pressure on their state government to sign the compact law, like New York has, where they guarantee that no matter the outcome in their state, their electors would pledge to vote for the person who won the popular vote."

The other method- a constitutional amendment- is unlikely, says Kneeland, as three-quarters of the states would have to vote to change the Constitution.

After the Electors cast their ballots on Monday, Congress will meet on January 6 to count the votes.