If companies could change when and how employees work when storms hit, it would reduce congestion, get the roads plowed fast and make it safer trying to get to work and school. But how many companies are willing to do this for their employees?

With the lake effect storms hitting us at the worst possible times -- the morning and evening commutes -- we wondered why don't businesses, agencies and governments change the way their employees work during a storm?

We thought if companies could change when and how employees work when storms hit, it would reduce congestion, get the roads plowed fast and make it safer trying to get to work and school.

Jessica Moriarty was trying to get from Greece to Victor to get to work.

"I started sliding around getting onto 490 and I was like, 'okay, this is too much,'" says Moriarty.

She finally pulled off the road at her brothers apartment. She called work and her boss told her go back and work from home.

"I was really thankful for that because if they were like, you really need to come in that's just dangerous I think at that point," says Moriarty.

What if more business owners made that decision during a storm? That's what we asked the head of Environmental Services for Rochester.

News10NBC: "Like have them come in later, let them leave early, let them work from home: would it make your job easier?"

Norm Jones, City of Rochester Dept. of Environmental Services: "Well, less traffic on the streets to allow our plows to have unfettered access to our roads makes our job easier."

Between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m., there are more than 14,000 cars on I-390 south at the airport, more than 7,000 on 590 south bound at Elmwood, and more near 17,000 cars on I-490 heading into downtown. That's why they're a parking lot in the storm.

Thursday, the county and the city did what we're talking about: the county sent employees home at 2 p.m. The city at 3 p.m. What if more businesses and agencies did that?

News10NBC: "Would that increase public safety?"

Bob Burns, Director of Public Safety: "It would certainly reduce the volume of cars and trucks on our highways at the worst possible time."

New York City staggers employee dismissal times on Fridays in the summer. Why can't we do that when we know a storm is going to hit at rush hour?