Tuesday, the state announced districts across New York will have the opportunity to voluntarily use computer-based testing. There are pro and cons to every decision, but education officials say this will not only speed up the testing process, but also the results, so teachers know sooner rather than later how well their students are progressing.

Your children might be putting down the pencil and paper when it comes to taking tests at school.

Tuesday, the state announced districts across New York will have the opportunity to voluntarily use computer-based testing.

There are pro and cons to every decision, but education officials say this will not only speed up the testing process, but also the results, so teachers know sooner rather than later how well their students are progressing.

The state says computer-based testing will be voluntary and would only be given to students in grades 3 through 8 for the English language arts and math tests. Schools will also be given the flexibility of choosing computer or paper-based testing by grade and subject area.

The Monroe County School Board Association confirms to us that the Churchville-Chili school district will be using computer-based testing in 2017. They say other districts are looking into it, but their decision will depend on the capacity and the infrastructure of their computer systems.

As many parents know, a lot of schools already use computers, iPads and Chrome books in the classroom, so many students will be comfortable with this testing method. However, that doesn't mean the good old pencil and paper are a thing of the past.

"For testing, I think you're talking about an isolated opportunity -- and again, in the classroom, they're not on computers all day. They are doing paper and pencil tasks and they're still learning to manipulate those tools," says Sherry Johnson of the Monroe County School Board Association. "Pencils, crayons, pens, so you're not taking that away, you're not diminishing that."

Johnson says local schools will likely roll out computer-based testing grade by grade not district-wide, but again, that's up to the individual districts.